How to Make Vegetable Broth from Vegetable Scraps

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vegetable broth

Making vegetable broth at home is a great way to save money and add flavor and nutrients to various dishes like soups, rice, quinoa or sauces. Store-bought broths often have unhealthy additives, so it’s best to make it at home.

I always save inedible organic vegetable scraps like tough broccoli stalks, the ends of carrots, the stems of kale and the tough ends of asparagus and store it in a bag or container in the freezer. Once the bag is almost full of vegetable scraps, I use them to make vegetable broth. You can use any vegetable scraps that you want. I always add fresh chopped onion, garlic cloves, herbs like sage and oregano and salt and pepper.

Vegetable broth recipe:

Use any leftover vegetables, or vegetable scraps you have. You can use just about any vegetables you want for broth. Like I said, I always save inedible organic vegetable scraps like tough broccoli stalks, the ends of carrots, the stems of kale and the tough ends of asparagus and store it in a bag or container in the freezer. Then, when it’s full I’ll put them all together in a pot to make broth.

1. Put vegetable scraps, onion, garlic and herbs of your choice (sage, marjoram, oregano, etc.) in a large stock pot. Add enough water to completely cover the vegetables.

2. Bring to a rolling boil, then turn heat down to low so that the water is gently simmering. Add salt and pepper. Let simmer for at least an hour. The longer you simmer, the more the flavors will come out.

3. After about 1-2 hours, turn off heat. Let cool.

4. Store in jars in the fridge or freezer for later use.

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DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL CONNECTION: Some of the links in my blog are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” PAID ENDORSEMENT DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. I only endorse products that align with the ideals of Healy Eats Real and that I believe would be of value to my readers. FDA DISCLOSURE: Information and statements regarding health claims on this blog have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Comments

  1. Andrea says

    Hi! Thanks for this and all your other great recipes! This is probably a dumb question but, at the end, you strain the veggie pieces from the broth, right?

    tHanks!

  2. Carolyn says

    I save the water from all veggies I cook and put them in a container and freeze them, to use for soup. Can’t stand the thoughts of throwing all those nutrients down the drain.

  3. Marilyn says

    I take it one further as I have limited freezer space. After I strain the liquid through cheesecloth, I boil it again, ladle into hot sterilized quart jars and then pressure can. This seals it so I can store it in my pantry.

    I have found that just about anything you can find in a can/jar at a big box store or grocer, you can put in a jar for yourself.

    Happy Canning!!!

    Marilyn in MS

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